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The Evryscope (“wide-seer”) is an array of telescopes pointed at every part of the accessible sky simultaneously and continuously, together forming a gigapixel-scale telescope monitoring an overlapping 8,000 square degree field every 2 minutes.

Looking for info on the Proxima superflare? Here’s our public information page.

Funded by NSF/ATI and NSF/CAREER, and operating at CTIO since May 2015, the Evryscope-South will soon be joined by the Evryscope-North to give truly-all-sky coverage.Find the details of the Evryscope design in this paper, which includes a comprehensive look at our science plans for the system. Interested in collaboration to use Evryscope data? Please contact Nick Law (nmlaw-at-physics-dot-unc-dot-edu).

 

Recent Project News

Three new Evryscope papers!

  • May 11th, 2019

EvryFlare I: Long-term Evryscope Monitoring of Flares from the Cool Stars Across Half the Southern Sky (submitted to AJ)
Howard, Ward S.; Corbett, Hank; Law, Nicholas M.; Ratzloff, Jeffrey K.; Glazier, Amy L.; Fors, Octavi; del Ser, Daniel; Haislip, Joshua

Variables in the Southern Polar Region Evryscope 2016 Dataset (accepted to PASP)
Ratzloff, Jeffrey K.; Corbett, Henry T.; Law, Nicholas M.; Barlow, Brad N.; Glazier, Amy; Howard, Ward S.; Fors, Octavi; del Ser, Daniel; Trifonov, Trifon 

Building the Evryscope: Hardware Design and Performance (accepted to PASP)
Jeffrey K. Ratzloff, Nicholas M. Law, Octavi Fors, Henry T. Corbett, Ward S. Howard, Daniel del Ser, Joshua Haislip

Evryscope @ AAS Winter 2019

  • January 7th, 2019

The Evryscope team and collaborators are presenting talks and posters about Evryscope science results and papers at the AAS winter meeting:

Overview project-status and science-result iPoster, viewable every day in the poster sessions (official session is Wednesday evening), and online.

10am Tuesday (Terrestrial Planets and Habitability; 203.01):

Evryscope flares as probes of the space weather environments of Proxima b and the nearest rocky exoplanets (Ward Howard)

Tuesday posters (Extrasolar Planets: Characterization & Theory; 247.05):

Evryscope and K2 Constraints on TRAPPIST-1 Superflare Occurrence and Planetary Habitability
(Amy Glazier)

Wednesday posters (Surveys and Large Programs; 363.11):

All-sky rapid transient searches with the Evryscope network (Hank Corbett)

Wednesday posters (Variable Stars; 360.16):

Evryscope Observations of Post-Common-Envelope Hot Subdwarf Systems (Kyle Corcoran)

2pm Thursday (Extrasolar Planets: Detection – Transit and Microlensing Searches):

Fast Cadence Planet-searches with the All-sky, Gigapixel-scale Evryscope (Jeffrey Ratzloff)

Thursday posters (Stars In All Their Glory; 464.03):

Evryscope Photometry of the New Hot Subdwarf Reflection Effect Binary EC 01578-1743 (Stephen Walser)

Northern Evryscope deployed!

  • October 27th, 2018

We’ve completed a successful deployment of the Northern Evryscope. The system is currently undergoing commissioning.

Evryscope detects a superflare from Proxima Centauri

  • April 9th, 2018

The Evryscope has detected a superflare that briefly made the tiny star Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to our Sun, 70x brighter. Proxima b is a terrestrial-mass planet in the habitable-zone of Proxima Centauri. Proxima Centauri’s high stellar activity however casts doubt on the habitability of Proxima b: sufficiently bright and frequent flares may destroy the planet’s ozone layer, allowing lethal levels of UV flux to reach its surface. In March 2016, the Evryscope observed the first naked-eye-visible superflare detected from Proxima Centauri.

Proxima increased in brightness by a factor of ~68 during the superflare, reaching a brightness just visible to the naked eye at dark sites (and easily seen with binoculars, if someone was looking in the right direction). It’s probably worth mentioning that some people on Twitter have misinterpreted our paper to suggest that we’re claiming this event would have been easily visible to most people at most sites — which it would not have been, and which don’t claim in the paper. We just use “naked-eye” as a compact way to say the event reached a brightness in visible-light that can be detected by the human eye without optical aids under ideal conditions, to give an […]